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Archaeology

Roman and Barbarian Men

Welcome to the Department of Archaeology

 As members of one of the largest Archaeology Departments in the country, we are proud to offer:

- A wide ranging undergraduate programme providing you with choice and the opportunity to obtain a range of skills in humanities and science based studies.

- An invigorating research environment, providing high quality postgraduate research training and a challenging doctoral programme.

- Active involvement in the public access to archaeological research.

- A friendly and supportive working environment.

Archaeology

ArchAtlas Donation

ArchAtlas Donation

Description

If you have found the ArchAtlas website interesting or useful for research or teaching, would you be willing to make a small contribution to help us maintain and develop it further? We would like to be able to greatly increase the number and geographical range of sites on the digital atlas (http://www.archatlas.dept.shef.ac.uk/atlas/atlas.php) and add information relating to these, and eventually to develop an explanatory section on prehistoric 'culture' names which will show their spatial and chronological dimensions and examples of typical artefact assemblages. We would also like to continue to publish 'visual essays', both commissioned and unsolicited, on ArchAtlas Journal (http://www.archatlas.dept.shef.ac.uk/journal/journal.php).

ArchAtlas is a web-orientated archaeological mapping project, designed to be of use both for research and teaching purposes.  It was founded by the late Prof. Andrew Sherratt and has been hosted by the Department of Archaeology in Sheffield since 2005.  The electronic journal (ArchAtlas Journal) publishes 'visual essays' on a wide range of archaeological problems and themes, particularly ones in which spatial processes are important.  Examples of such themes are the spread of farming, the formation of trade contacts, the growth of urban systems.  Another aspect of the website is a digital archaeological atlas, in which we would like eventually to include information about environments, cultures and chronologies as well as sites themselves.  The website also explores different ways of visualising sites, for example at different scales, within their wider environmental contexts, within the contexts of route networks, or as panoramas.

ArchAtlas makes all of its content freely available to everyone, and we would like to maintain this open-access model.  The website is currently maintained by a very small, part-time, unpaid team of two.  We need to raise funds to develop ArchAtlas further, which will mean purchasing some new dedicated equipment and funding paid research assistance in digital mapping, web development and database development. We aim, in particular, to greatly increase the number and geographical range of sites on the digital atlas (all co-ordinates have to be individually verified first for accuracy), and to increase the amounts of information relating to these.  In the near future, we would also like to add a section containing a glossary of prehistoric 'culture' names, displayed in both spatial and time dimensions and linked to typical artefact assemblages.

For more information please see: http://www.archatlas.dept.shef.ac.uk/Home.php

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Understanding Zooarcheaology I

Understanding Zooarcheaology I

Description

The Understanding Zooarchaeology I short course will run for the twelfth time, from the 17th to the 19th of January 2018. Animal bones and teeth are among the most common remains found on archaeological sites, and this three-day course will provide participants with an understanding of the basic methods that zooarchaeologists use to understand animal bone evidence. During this course participants will begin to develop the skills necessary to: understand the principles of excavating animal bones; care for and store bones after excavation; identify different species from their bones and teeth; age and sex bones; recognize taphonomy, butchery and pathology; understand how zooarchaeological material is analysed and quantified; interpret site reports and zooarchaeological literature. The course is directed to students, professionals and enthusiasts and does not require any previous knowledge of the discipline. The teaching will be delivered through short lectures, hands-on practical activities and case studies.

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Archaeology Key Deposits

Archaeology Key Deposits

£10.00

Description

Archaeology Key Deposits
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Entheseal changes

Workshop: The new Coimbra method for recording entheseal changes

£5.00

Description

Workshop aimed at teaching the new Coimbra method for recording entheseal changes in human skeletons.
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